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20130131
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
of violence. >> are you optimistic alexis? >> i think there is still a lot of work to do, work to do in terms of other proposals. but in general, i am optimistic. i think this is an opportunity to make real change happen. >> colin, the vice president mentioned you by name. what's your reaction again to what you heard today? >> that was quite shocking to hear my name mentioned by that. overall, highly encouraged by the leadership from the white house on this issue coupled with the overwhelming support from grassroots people from across the country, including gun owners and nra members who have reached out saying what you are talking about makes sense. we think coming from the top down and working from the bottom up, it's going to lead to some positive change in the country. >> you are part of the brady campaign. you fight for gun control measureses. it has become a very personal calling for you. do you think that the president can legislatively get through an assault weapons ban? >> i think we need to look at all the proposals that he is putting out there. if we get success on any one of those
expect quite a bit. >> thank you so much from new york. alexis wineman grew up knowing she was not like other kids, but not until she turned 11 she found out why. the story of this girl who did not let her disorder get in the way of her dreams. >> miss montana surrounded by 50 other beauty queens on stage. all hoping to become miss america. for most of her early life. alexis wineman spent time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong, but the small town didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11 after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor put a name to wineman's condition. pervasive development disorder, a mild form of autism. >> children with autism are very intelligent, but very quiet and socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't become beauty queens either, but one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to accept myse
, the personal. two takes on what happened at the white house today. alexy haller, the uncle of noah pozner. along with colin goddard. colin was shot four times in a classroom at virginia tech. i was wondering what your reaction was to what you heard. >> based on what we heard before the announcement when the families met with the president and the vice president and during the announcement itself, i was satisfied and pleased to see that the administration is treating this so seriously. and i think the strong sense i got was that they were determined to make a major change here and to enact significant reforms that would put a stop to this kind of violence. >> are you optimistic? >> i'm optimistic to some of the proposals. i still think there is a lot of work to do. i still think there is work to do in terms of other proposals. but in general i am optimistic. i think that this is an opportunity to make real change happen. >> colin, the vice president mentioned you by name. what is your reaction to what you heard today? >> that was quite shocking to hear my name mentioned like that. but over
this for many alexis to, unless they get their act together. melissa: is there one thing republicans to put on the table that would turn the tide of the conversation? cut military spending, something that can make them look fresh and new? >> all laugh to say, they're responsible and the other side is not to read at think that message, like 60 percent said government spending is out of control. but the question is how you go about it. you can't do it in a butcher block fashion that would allow people to get hurt. the political screening will be so intense. you saw what happened with paul ryan, the head of the house budget committee republican from wisconsin when heated. he got hammered for cutting cuts in terms of medicare in the seniors, even those who are involved with tea party. wait a second. not me. go after the government workers, somebody else, but not me. it has to be done in a way that allows the american people to see republicans and democrats in it together. that would give it the republicans moral high ground to say we're the ones being responsible. melissa: i love it. thank you.
from whether or not if something can pass to really when it is. and i think that time is now. >> alexy, i appreciate you being on tonight, and colin as well. thank you very much. let's talk about the politics. so far they have included that nra ad, the congressional threat of impeachment. here to talk about it cnn contributor and consultant margaret hooper, charles below and david gergen. david, when you look at these proposals, are some of them non-starters? >> i think first of all, we have to say, anderson, many times in the past we have complained about a lack of leadership by president obama. this time he has stepped up. he is taking the lead. this is what a president who is really committed. >> he went big. >> he went big. you have to give him credit for that. his problem is that he is handicapped. he doesn't have enough power through the executive office to do this alone. most of these are small bore initiatives that he is going to do on his own. he needs the congress to get this done. and so far we have to bring politics into this, because this is a political matter in this trag
life, alexis wineman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there was something wrong, but their small town of cutbank, montana, didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at age 11, after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor finally put a name to her condition -- pervasive development disorder. a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent. but very quiet. socially awkward, and they don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't end up becoming beauty queens either. but wineman says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to really accept myself and my autism. and i realized that my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> she entered the miss montana pageants as a way to prove to herself she could do anything she set her mind to. >> i fell in love with the program. good thing, too, because i won. i wasn'
to become miss america. but for most of her early life, alexis weinman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong but their small town of cutbank, montana didn't have the resources to help them figure out what it was. at the age of 11, a doctor finally put a name to her condition. pervasive development disorder. a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent but very quiet. socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically, they don't end up becoming beauty queens either but she says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to accept myself and my autism and i realized that my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> she entered the miss montana pageant as a way to problem she could do anything. >> i fell in love with the program, good thing too because i won. i wasn't expecting to win but it's funny how things work
to meet our obligations. that's not who we are. major, then alexis. >> as you noted, jay, the situation in algeria is very fluid and you are trying to discern fact from fiction. once that process is finished, does the president intend to communicate with the country about what he knows and what has happened? >> well, i think -- i have no scheduling announcements to make on behalf of the president, and i think we're focused now on finding out and seeking clarity about the events in algeria. and once we know more and once we have more that we can convey to you, we'll make assessments based on that. >> does the white house believe that there is something at work in mali or algeria that is moving or shifting in a way that's maybe catching the american public's attention for the first time? threat patterns? different areas of conflict? an aggressiveness on al qaeda or affiliates that needs perhaps more communication with the american public, a greater sense of what's actually going on here? >> we here in the white house and throughout the administration are intensely focused on al qaeda and
a organization and speaks out denies knowing about the so-called brothel run by alexis wright, but admits to co-signing a loan. >> never became romantic. we did have intimate moments, but it's not what i would consider romantic. >> and i'm confused about the difference. >> want to explain. >> when it involves money. >> brian: i'm going to reread my issue of glamour and find out if there is with a difference. >> alisyn: her alleged client list 150 men, some well-known around town and those are your headlines. >> steve: okay, not too long ago out in mt. carmel, pennsylvania, we'll tell you a little how a girl was talking to another girl while waiting for the bus and involved a hello kitty paint gun. >> alisyn: bubble gun. >> steve: you're not going to believe what happened to the kid. >> alisyn: they were five years old. >> they were five. >> alisyn: more on that and also, who can forget this moment? >> ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> alisyn: and on this inaugural weekend we'll take a look back at some of the most memorable speeches given by past
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)